• Deputy hurt in crash
    By Gordon Dritschilo
    Staff Writer | January 28,2013
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    A Rutland County Sheriff’s deputy was hurt in a crash in Killington on Sunday.

    Vermont State Police said Deputy Jayson Flood, 33, was taken to Rutland Regional Medical Center for “unknown back, neck, and head injuries” after his cruiser, a 2006 Ford Crown Victoria, was involved in a collision with a 2002 Jeep Wrangler.

    A hospital spokeswoman said Flood’s condition was “fair” Sunday evening.

    Police said Flood was driving east on Route 4 near Pico ski area at around 2:45 p.m. and the Jeep, driven by Andrew J. Palmer, 37, of Rutland, was behind him.

    Flood activated his emergency lights and veered right in preparation to make a U-turn, according to police, but Palmer tried to drive around him rather than “obey and utilize caution when emergency vehicle lights were activated.”

    The cruiser sustained severe damage to the driver’s side, according to police, while the Jeep sustained dents and scrapes to its passenger side.

    Police said speed and alcohol were not factors in the crash. They did not indicate why Flood was making the U-turn. A dispatcher for the Rutland County Sheriff’s Department said they could not comment on the crash as it was still under investigation by state police.

    The Vermont State Police were assisted by members of the Rutland County Sheriff’s Department, Rutland City Police Department, Regional Ambulance Service, and the Killington Ski Resort.

    @Tagline:gordon.dritschilo

    @rutlandherald.com
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