• Restore nature to farm fields
    May 01,2013
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    Regarding H.112: As a local journalist who’s reported on the connection between soil, food and health, I’ve learned a lot about GM crops, and want to make a couple of points.

    While mention of GMOs prompts images of Ph.Ds in lab coats or slick, brand-name goods on the grocery shelves, the introduction of these plants into our natural environment has consequences — consequences that may not be as controllable or benign as the biotech industry would have us believe.

    Many GMO plants are engineered to “tolerate herbicides.” This means that by design, such GMO crops are treated with chemicals, most likely glyphosate (trade name: Roundup). Glyphosate works by chelating, or binding, minerals. This affects a plant’s ability to take up nutrients.

    The chemical also alters the balance of microorganisms in the soil, which may lead to more fungicide use. This, in turn, impairs soil life, and all that depends on it. A North Dakota farmer I interviewed described walking into a wheat field and hearing no insects. “The soil looked dead. It had been sprayed twice with fungicide. … It killed off the good fungi, too.”

    The widespread use of herbicides has also meant the advent of “superweeds”: plants that have developed resistance to weed-killers. The industry’s answer? Create GMOs to withstand another herbicide, which means an additional dousing of chemicals.

    The long-term safety of GMOs and their chemical accompaniments has not been established. Scientists whose research raised concern have suffered professionally, including being forced out of their jobs.

    The growing of food depends on a living system; it’s not simply a matter of technology. We’re part of that living system, and I worry about the cost to our health and the environment if we mess with it. Knowledge of whether food is genetically modified is the least we should be given.


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