• Snow slows Maine power work; Mich. effort ongoing
    the associated press | December 27,2013
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    Tom Henson sorts through frozen food that he’s keeping frozen on a deck outside his home in Litchfield, Maine Thursday.
    GARDINER, Maine — Snow fell Thursday in places still hustling to get power back on after a weekend ice storm that turned out the lights from Michigan to Maine and into Canada.

    Eastern Maine and parts of the state’s interior that have been without electricity since Sunday anticipated 3 to 7 inches of snow by the time the latest system pushed off the coast Thursday night. Utilities worried that the additional weight on branches and transmission lines could cause setbacks in the around-the-clock efforts to restore power.

    “We don’t think it’s going to help us much, that’s for sure,” said Susan Faloon, a spokeswoman for Bangor Hydro Electric in Maine. “There was some concern expressed over the last couple of days about that storm coming because obviously we still have lot of stuff weighing down trees and lines.

    “The system is pretty compromised out there,” she said. “We expect we will have more outages.”

    In Michigan, where about half a million homes and businesses lost power at the peak of the weekend storm, an inch or so of snow was expected. Utilities there reported 101,000 customers without power Thursday morning and said it could be Saturday before all electricity is restored.

    Tony Carone lost power in his Lapeer, Mich., home Sunday morning. The 52-year-old lineman for Detroit-based DTE knew there were long hours ahead.

    “I was one of the casualties,” he said while taking a break from restoration work Thursday morning.

    Maine reported more than 21,000 customers still out, down from a high of more than 106,000. There were more than 101,000 without power in three Canadian provinces — Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick — including 54,000 in the city of Toronto.

    Day five without power was met by tired but mostly stoic Mainers.

    Bob and Katrina Johnson spent Christmas Eve at a family member’s house that had no electricity. Christmas morning was at their powerless house in Pittston and that afternoon meant a trip to Katrina’s mother’s house in Gardiner, which also had no electricity. Nonetheless, they exchanged presents and celebrated.

    By Thursday, the couple had grown weary from hauling a portable generator back and forth between their home and her mother’s home to keep a freezer-load of moose meat from spoiling and run the heat long enough to keep pipes from freezing and bursting.

    “You have to go with the flow and adapt, and do the best you can,” Katrina Johnson said. “You learn how to deal with it. Do you like it? No, but you deal with it.”

    In hard-hit Kennebec County, where the state capital of Augusta is located, glistening trees sagged under the weight of ice. Many tree limbs had snapped, littering yards.

    On one road, workers in four bucket trucks from Massachusetts’ N-Star utility company worked patiently to get a power line lifted back into place as snow fell sporadically. Paul Graham, the crew supervisor from Waltham, Mass., and a veteran of the devastating ice storm of 1998, said it could’ve been worse, even as his team worked its third consecutive 18-hour shift.

    “Honestly, you got lucky,” he said. “If it was a little more ice, poles would have been broken. Things would be on the ground. That’s my take. If there was another quarter of an inch or a half-inch of ice, people would’ve been out for a long, long, long time.

    “But I’m sure no one is thinking they’re lucky, right?”

    Most utility customers in Maine were expected to have their lights on by week’s end, but there were some pockets where damage was so severe it could take until Wednesday.
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