• US job growth eases but tops 200K for a 6th month
    the associated press | August 02,2014
    • Email Article
    •  Print Article
    ap file photo

    Job seekers wait in line to meet with recruiters during a recent job fair in Philadelphia.
    WASHINGTON — U.S. employers extended their solid hiring into July by adding 209,000 jobs. It was the sixth straight month of job growth above 200,000, evidence that businesses are gradually shedding the caution that had marked the 5-year-old recovery.

    July’s gain was less than in the previous three months, though, and probably wasn’t strong enough to suggest that the Federal Reserve will soon raise interest rates to curb inflation.

    But the Labor Department’s monthly jobs report Friday pointed to an economy that has bounced back with force after a grim start to the year and is expected to sustain its strength into 2015. Along with the consistent job growth, consumer spending is rising, manufacturing is strengthening and auto sales are up.

    The unemployment rate ticked up in July to 6.2 percent from 6.1 percent as more Americans started looking for work. Most didn’t find jobs, but the increase suggests that they’re more optimistic about their prospects. The jobless aren’t counted as unemployed unless they’re actively seeking work.

    Average job gains over the past six months reached 244,000 in July, the best such monthly average in eight years.

    “Job growth slowed in July after heated gains in the past three months,” Sal Guatieri, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, noted in a research note. “But hiring trends remain solid, reflecting a strengthening economy.”

    Stock market indexes fell in early-afternoon trading. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note dipped, suggesting less concern about a Fed rate increase.

    The pickup in hiring has yet to translate, however, into larger paychecks for most Americans, a factor that has hobbled the recovery. In July, average hourly earnings ticked up just a penny to $24.45. That’s just 2 percent higher than it was 12 months earlier and is slightly below current inflation of 2.1 percent. In a healthy economy, wages before inflation would rise 3.5 percent to 4 percent annually.

    The proportion of working-age adults who either have a job or are looking for one rose slightly in July from a 35-year low to 62.9 percent. It was the first increase in four months.

    Weak pay gains are restraining the housing market, usually a key driver of growth. A measure of signed contracts to buy homes slipped in June, the National Association of Realtors said this week.

    Pay has failed to accelerate in part because many Americans are still uncertain about the economy’s long-term health, said Mike Schenk, a senior economist at the Credit Union National Association.

    Schenk expects wages to pick up once the unemployment rate falls to around 5.5 percent — a level at which some businesses will have to increase pay to keep workers and some employees will be more confident asking for a raise.

    “People are still bruised,” Schenk said. “I don’t think they feel comfortable, generally speaking, walking in and asking for raises at this point.”

    Still, Friday’s report echoes other data that point to an improving economy. Growth accelerated during the April-June quarter, the government said Wednesday, after contracting sharply in the first three months of the year. Last quarter’s rebound assuaged fears that growth was too weak to support this year’s rapid hiring.

    And on Friday, the government said consumer spending and income picked up in June. A separate report showed that manufacturing expanded in July at the fastest pace in more than three years as new orders surged, production rose and factories ramped up hiring.
    • Email Article
    •  Print Article
    MORE IN National / World Business

    CHICAGO — An economic engine. A jumpstart for lower-income students. Full Story

    LISBON, Portugal — An anti-austerity alliance including radical leftist parties takes... Full Story

    Is Portugal about to go down the same road as Greece?
    More Articles