Scientists seek ways to finally take a real measure of pain

Anesthesiologist and Acupuncture Specialist Sarah Reece-Stremtan applies acupuncture needle on Sarah Taylor's forehead during an acupuncture treatment at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington, Monday, Dec. 10, 2018. Over and over, the 17-year-old struggled to make doctors understand her sometimes debilitating levels of pain, first from joint-damaging childhood arthritis and then from fibromyalgia. "It's very frustrating to be in pain and you have to wait like six weeks, two months, to see if the drug's working," said Sarah, who uses a combination of medications, acupuncture and lots of exercise to counter her pain. Children's National Medical Center is testing an experimental device that aims to measure pain according to how pupils react to certain stimuli. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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