Paula Peters bit.ly/1122plimplant

Paula Peters bit.ly/1122plimplant

Darius Coombs: “You hear about 1620 being a big year. That’s when the colonists landed at what is called Plymouth today. But a bigger year for our people would be 1615, before any major plague hit around here. Between 1616 and 1618 a major disease swept through and wiped out more than 70 percent of the Wampanoag people within a two-year span. That plague started up in northern Maine, probably brought by English and French fishermen who came into contact with native people. When the colonists got here in 1620, this whole area had been wiped out and the closest living Wampanoag community, at a place called Middleboro — we call it Namasket — was about 15 miles west of here. They came here and found nobody living here. What they found here was bones and abandoned cornfields and other cleared areas. They didn’t encounter a living native person until March of 1621.”

Kelly Araujo: “It was nine weeks we were on the sea and in some boisterous storms, too. There was a time we were getting tossed to and fro and, at one time, the main beam started to bow, started to bend, and it was cracking. ... We were cold and damp for so long. Some of us started to get coughs and colds, some with the scurvy. And then folks started to die. ... And then, finally, Nov. 9th, we sighted land, which we deemed to be Cape Cod and proved afterwards that it was. Many of us fell on our knees and thanked God in Heaven for our safe arrival.”

Paula Peters: “Our culture is a natural resource, just like a river, just like the rain, just like the trees and the forest. It is a natural resource that is something to be preserved and I feel very important, and, as I said, very relevant if we are to continue to survive and evolve as a people, as a nation, as a world. If we don’t take into consideration the importance of not just my culture, but everyone’s traditional backgrounds and cultures, then there’s a lot to be lost. ... What people don’t know is that, yes, there were many people who came over on that first ship, the Mayflower, that came here for religious freedom. And, ironically, they came here and established a colony that didn’t afford that same right to the people who were indigenous to this region. ... We have archaeological evidence that shows we’ve been here for more than 12,000 years, and we’ve taken instruction from our creator. The colonists didn’t regard that as important. We’ve talked a little bit about Manifest Destiny and the doctrine of discovery, which just totally discounted the spiritual beliefs of indigenous people and our own creation stories. I think that’s kind of sad.”

0
0
0
0
0
You must be logged in to react.
Click any reaction to login.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.