Post Office Move

Brendan Hancock of Prana Design of Sunapee, N.H., paints a railing in the Annex Building of the new Rutland post office on a rainy Thursday afternoon. The post office is moving its location next door to make more room for more federal offices at the current location.

The last day of the Rutland post office on West Street will be Saturday, but those who pick up mail, buy stamps or send packages there will only have to cross the parking lot to get to the new location at the post office’s annex.

Rutland Postmaster James M. Ragosta II said the move was originally planned for October, but construction issues caused delays.

On Thursday, however, Ragosta said he was packing up, and the move would take place within days.

A handwritten sign at the post office on Thursday said the last day people could buy stamps or retrieve mail from their post office boxes was Saturday.

Starting on Tuesday, those services will be available at the new site across the parking lot from where they are now.

Monday is Veterans Day and the post office will not be open.

The new site of the Rutland U.S. Postal Service is on state and federal historical registries because it is believed to be one of the few art deco-style buildings in Vermont. It was built in 1927 and originally used as a car dealership.

Ragosta said customers will be able to pick up new keys for post office boxes next week in the new building.

According to Ragosta, the move from one building to the other will not mean any interruption of services. He said it has not affected the mail delivery coming from the Rutland office at all.

“Literally the only difference, as far as the public goes, is instead of coming into this building to pick up their field box mail or to do any transactions at the front window, they’ll go to that building across the parking lot,” he said.

No new services are being added to the Rutland post office. Ragosta said everything will be the same except the location.

The Rutland City Board of Aldermen were told in June 2018 the post office was moving, in part, because they had more space in their current location than they needed.

While Ragosta said he wasn’t certain how long the post office had been in its existing location, he estimated the building was from the 1930s.

Over the years, some historic signs and posters have been gathered at the postal offices but Ragosta said the memorabilia won’t be making the trip to the new building.

He added that he believed the Postal Service was one of the current building’s original tenants.

Ragosta said the move is to make room for more federal offices in the building. The federal General Services Administration bought the building in 2009, and it will remain a federal office building after the postal service is relocated.

The U.S. District Court for Vermont will not move from its current location.

Ragosta said he expected some “punch-list” items will still need to be fixed when the new site opens so he apologized to customers in advance for any inconvenience.

“We should be wrapping it up here in the next month or two,” he said.

In its new location, the Rutland post office will still be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday.

Customers can access their post office boxes from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday, but the lobby is closed Sundays and holidays.

The new location will be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

patrick.mcardle

@rutlandherald.com

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