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Any time the international community convenes to talk about climate change, there’s a predictable mix of criticism and encouragement. This month’s 50th anniversary of the Stockholm Declaration, commemorating the United Nations first official gathering to discuss the “human environment” and w…

The installation of a historic site marker in Windsor honoring a Negro woman slave has been long overdue, and accolades are owed to those who moved the project to completion. But while a 2-foot by 3-foot, bronze plaque is inadequate to memorialize any life, the state of Vermont and the marke…

The last 18 months of American politics may very well be the poster child for this quote: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing,” frequently and mistakenly attributed to Edmund Burke. Its origin is more likely from an 1867 inaugural address at the Un…

I originally wrote this to introduce a couple of my pro-choice paintings, Trust Women and My Body My Decision. I posted a version of this message May 4 on Facebook, after it was leaked that Roe v. Wade would be overturned by the Supreme Court. I have sent a copy of this message, along with c…

My first full-time job began on a hot, humid Monday morning, barely a week after high school graduation, marking the first time in my life I would be deprived of summer vacation and burdened by the expectations of others. In fact, I’d never before contemplated remaining in one place for eigh…

Another day, another Newtown: When news of another school slaughter broke, this time again in Texas, the bile that rose in my throat was as bitter as the memory of Columbine, Newtown, Parkland — and the other grievous incidents of gun violence in schools, all 554 of them since Columbine, as …

Landing the first several trout of the season usually requires concentration enough to — at least temporarily — relieve me of the cascading thoughts that lately take me on distressing side trips: flights of fancy pitting us against insurmountable odds, facing unsolvable problems. Releasing a…

When I was a young man attending Harwood Union in the late-’90s, I/we (the boys who hunted) would leave our guns in our vehicles, parked on school grounds, while school was in session, in preparation for hunting after school hours. In fact, my car at the time was an old beat-up Saab, and I w…

During the early-1950s, I spent several months living and working on a small ranch in west-central Texas. I was the only Anglo working there — and a New England Yankee, at that. My only contact with the outside world was the news from Dallas on the radio at breakfast. Monday morning’s broadc…

My Grandmother Libertoff, a stern and unhappy divorced woman, lived in a basement apartment in what is now called the Carroll Gardens section of Brooklyn, New York. The absence of any natural light — the dwelling had no window — created a rather gloomy ambience. and for some unexplained reas…

The contradictions are nothing short of astonishing. The same contingent who can — without any apparent difficulty — simultaneously oppose both birth control and abortion; who are outraged at the suggestion of institutional racism while actively working to disenfranchise millions of Black vo…

On a day that feels like a negotiated settlement, judicially mandated compensation for the deep winter and even deeper mud, some still clinging to the sides of the car, I meander upstream, through the twisting channels of Kingsbury Branch as it slowly makes its way into North Montpelier Pond…

About a week ago, Robert Reich published an insightful essay in The Guardian U.S. edition titled “The second American civil war is already happening” (May 11). At one point, he comes up with a pithy turn of phrase to make a key observation: “The red ZIP codes are getting redder and the blue …

We certainly live in divided times, but this is nothing new. Divisions ebb and flow, and we are currently at another high point. Sometimes, I wonder if the “United” in USA is aspirational or a depressing joke. Luckily, I do see some glimmers of hope, in Vermont and in my home state of Michig…

Five Questions With

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Just over three months ago we started “Five Questions With ...” to put a human face to this pandemic. Today marks the final installment in this stage of the project, but it will continue with a new set of questions more focused on Vermont’s recovery. Here, Paul Costello, of Montpelier, offer…

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Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

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Marlee Brunton, of Middlesex, talks about the pandemic and its effects on her family.

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Alayna Martel, of Barre Town, is a registered nurse at UVM Medical Center. She talks about how, as a frontline workers, her life has been affected by the pandemic.

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Gayle Townsend-Lang, of Rutland, works full time wearing many hats for the Rutland City Public Schools as “Miss Gayle.” Here she talks about how she has been affected by the pandemic.

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Yankee Notebook columnist Willem Lange, of East Montpelier, talks about how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

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CPA Thomas Lauzon, of Barre, discusses how his life has been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation. Earlier this spring Lauzon was named to the governor’s Economic Mitigation & Recovery Task Force.

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Chrispin White, of Rutland, discusses how he has been adapting to self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting him.

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Christina Sweet, of Rutland, discusses how she and her family have been affected by the pandemic and self-isolation over these months.

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Educator and Vermont Mountaineers General Manager Brian Gallagher, of East Montpelier, discusses how the pandemic has affected his life. Earlier this spring, the Mountaineers’ organizers announced they would cancel the 2020 season.

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Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

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Cat Heatley, of Rutland, talks about how her life has been affected by the pandemic in recent weeks.

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Salon owner and fitness instructor April Rogers Farnham, of Plainfield, talks about how she has been affected by self-isolation.

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Barre Partnership Executive Director Tracie Lewis talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting her life.

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Montpelier writer Thomas Greene discusses how he has been affected by self-isolation and the pandemic.

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Drew Smith, of Rutland, talks about self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected his life.

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Jessica Van Orman talks about her experience in self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her life.

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Artist Jen Rondinone, of Rutland, reflects on self-isolation and how the pandemic has affected her and her family.

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Mark Breen, the "Eye on the Sky" guy from the Fairbanks Museum in St. Johnsbury, shares his thoughts in self-isolation and how the pandemic has been affecting his life.

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Senate President Pro Tem Tim Ashe discusses how self-isolation and the pandemic have affected his life.

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Executive Director of the Paramount Bruce Bouchard, of Rutland, talks about how his life has been affected by the pandemic and its consequences.

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WDEV radio talk show host Dave Gram, of Montpelier, talks about the pandemic and how it has been affecting him and his life.

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Carrie Allen, of Rutland, explains how she has been coping with self-isolation and what she hopes will come from it after the pandemic is over.

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Vermont cartoonist Tim Newcomb provides a bit of levity to his answers about self-isolation and how he is coping.

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Recovery Vermont’s Melissa Story, of Montpelier, shares her thoughts on self-isolation and how it has affected her.

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Major Jackson is a poet and professor at the University of Vermont. He lives in South Burlington.